Instructors and Coaches

Cosy Sheridan

Cosy Sheridan first appeared on the national folk scene in 1992 when she won the songwriting contests at The Kerrville Folk Festival and  The Telluride Bluegrass Festival.  The Boston Globe wrote: “She is now being called one of the best new singer/songwriters.”

Sheridan has been on the road ever since, playing clubs, concert halls and coffeehouses across the country.  “You can’t make it into double digits, and continue touring for twenty or so years, unless you know what you’re doing, and do it well,” said The Chicago Examiner.

She continues to be one of the most prolific songwriters in the folk scene. My Fence and My Neighbor was number four on the folk radio charts in 2018, and Pretty Bird was listed in Sing Out Magazine’s “Great CDs of 2014.”

A voice student at Berklee College of Music, and a guitar student of legendary finger style players Eric Schoenberg and Guy Van Duser, Sheridan has played at Carnegie Hall, The Cowgirl Hall of Fame and on the Jerry Lewis Telethon.

Backed by the strong rhythms and harmonies of her bass player Charlie Koch, she plays a percussive bluesy guitar style, often in open tunings and occasionally with two capos on the guitar neck.

Sheridan teaches classes in songwriting, performance and guitar at workshops and adult music camps across the country, and is the director of Moab Folk Camp in Moab, Utah.


Rachel Garlin

A San Francisco-based singer-songwriter, Garlin grew up in a music-infused household in Berkeley, California. She spent as much time learning folk songs on her dad’s Gibson J-50 as she did practicing her jump-shot with the State Championship Berkeley High basketball team. She went on to become a member of the Harvard hoops team while cutting her teeth at open mics in and around Cambridge, MA. Before becoming a full-time singer-songwriter, Garlin earned her teaching credential and taught in public schools in Phoenix, Berkeley and New York. Carrying the stories of her students with her, she began recording and touring. Her first album was a collaboration with her own childhood music-teacher-turned producer, Lisa Zeiler.

Songs from Garlin’s first two albums gained her recognition at folk festivals around the country, including the Newport Folk Festival where show won first place in the Talent Search. Her third album was captured during two live shows at the historic Freight & Salvage in Berkeley. Bassist Jon Evans and keys-player Julie Wolf joined the effort and became longtime collaborators. Later, she moved to New York to work with producer Ben Wisch. Garlin’s prolific output and momentum on the road allowed her to tour as far as Sweden and Scotland where she performed in the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in her mother’s homeland. Her songs aired on NPR’s Democracy Now!, Click and Clack’s Car Talk, and were featured in documentary films such as Fuel and A Womb of Their Own. She is currently recording her sixth full-length album at Fantasy Records with producer Julie Wolf. The new EP is due out this month, with Garlin performing at venues in the West, with a full length release scheduled for Spring 2019. Garlin lives in San Francisco with her wife and three kiddos.

“Storytelling at its best” —Curve Magazine

“An impressive catalog of unforgettable songs.” —Diffuser Magazine


Doug Blumer

Born and raised on the banks of the Mississippi River in Southern Missouri, Blumer’s musical education included equal parts Buck Owens and The Beatles, with dashes of bluegrass, gospel and folk. After a stint in the Navy, which included playing in a band on board his ship and in several different countries, he relocated to northern California.

It was in San Francisco that he became a respected and popular artist on the local music scene, performing and recording with several bands and writing award-winning original music. In the mid-90s, he formed and toured with Prime CD recording artists The Westerleys, eventually recording three albums with them.

In 2000, he toured and recorded with Texas honky-tonk great Dallas Wayne.

In 2010, Doug moved north from San Francisco to Sonoma County. He continues to perform in his new territory, and is excited about performing with his latest band, The Bohemian Highway.


Rebecca Troon
accompanies herself on guitar, banjo and percussion. She won first place in songwriting at the Gig Harbor Folk Festival in Washington in 2007. Her song “Animal Skin” was a finalist in the 2011 International Acoustic Music Awards, Best Folk/Americana/Roots category. She’s a member of the Honeysuckle Possums, a harmony-based old-time, originals and bluegrass band. CDs: Turning Around and Animal Skin. Past gigs: Bodie House, Auburn House Concert Series, Magic Juju Houseboat series, Trinity Backstage, Songtree Concert Series; also, Live Oak, Gig Harbor, Old-Time Fiddler’s Convention and Parkfield music festivals.


Severin Browne
was raised in a musical family where all the children were expected to play an instrument. He began with accordion, then moved to drums and saxophone before settling on guitar at the ripe old age of ten. His older brother Jackson, a talented singer/songwriter with many albums for the Asylum/Elektra labels, started out as first chair cornet in the elementary school band, where Severin soon joined him on the drums.

A former Motown recording artist and staff songwriter, Severin continues to enchant audiences with his clear voice, masterful guitar playing and finely crafted songs. After leaving Motown in the mid-seventies, Severin spent his time writing and performing in the Los Angeles area, where his songs were recorded by Thelma Houston, Patti Dahlstrom, Colin Blunstone, Twiggy, The Dillards, and Pamela Stanley, who had a Billboard #15 hit with Severin’s “I Don’t Want To Talk About It.”

His two post-Motown CDs, From the Edge of The World (released on Moo Records in 1996) and This Twisted Road (self-released in 2001), have both gotten great reviews. With roots in pop, jazz, country, rock and R&B, Severin surprises his acoustic audiences with his melodies.


Stan DeWitt
is a multi-faceted musician, songwriter, composer and multi-instrumentalist. As a songwriter, he has released seven albums, most recently the rock opera Silver Bullet alongside Derek O’Brien (Social Distortion). His album Long Day’s Journey was named a “DIY Top Ten” record by Performing Songwriter magazine in 2002. He has co-produced multiple records for Moonshine, Corrina Carter, Jellykka, Onward Etc., and Rick Schiller, among others. As an educator, he taught music at Coastline Community College for 26 years and authored an online music history course. He is the Minister of Music at Grace First Presbyterian Church in Long Beach, where he directs the choir for the traditional service and leads the band for the contemporary service, and he runs a band camp for kids every summer. Stan’s gifts are an invaluable part of camp year after year.


Dale LaDuke
was born in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. He began singing in church choirs when he was eight years old and was principle soloist and president of his high school choir, as well as trumpet player in the high school band. He went on to sing with the Michigan State Honors Choir and the Michigan State Fair Choir.

A songwriter from the beginning, Dale was determined to observe humanity at all levels, and to this end spent several years traveling around the country as an itinerant street peddler, finally settling in Los Angeles.

LaDuke was one of the founders of the popular Southern California country band Five Wheel Drive that was one of five finalists (and the only country band) in the first Yahoo Music Awards. The band was flown to the red carpet Yahoo awards show at Studio 54 in Manhattan that featured performances by David Bowie, Isaac Hayes, Allanis Morriset and many others. The group recorded two demos for Warner Bros. Nashville before finally disbanding. He then co-founded the folk group Kaedmon which went on to be a top pick of 2006 by both Music Connection magazine and KSUN radio.

He has recently begun to play solo shows around the country. His song “The Lone Ranger” has won or been nominated for several awards, most recently, for “Single of The Year” at the Los Angeles Music Awards.


Michael McNevin
grew up in the train town of Niles, California in the San Francisco East Bay hills. His songs read like short stories, full of heart, humor, and a keen eye for detail. Seasoned vocals and clean guitar work underscore the characters and places in his travels. He tours the US as a solo act, and occasionally gets a band together as McNevin & The Spokes. He is a winner of the Kerrville New Folk Award in Texas, a seven-time winner of the West Coast Songwriters “Song Of The Year” award, and a Performing Songwriter magazine “DIY Artist Of The Year.” He’s shared hall stages with Johnny Cash & The Carter Family, Donovan, Shawn Colvin, Laura Nyro, Richie Havens, and many others across the US and Europe. Festival appearances include Strawberry, High Sierra, Kerrville, Redwood Ramble, American River, Philly Folk Fest, and SummerFolk. He has five CDs and a couple of hard-to-find cassettes. Michael is also an Etch-A-Sketch artist of some renown.

In his spare time, Michael runs The Mudpuddle Shop, a converted barbershop. Now in it’s twelfth year, it is a hive for concerts, jams, swaps and workshops.


Mark Dann, producer, songwriter, instrumentalist.Mark Dann
is a staple of the East Coast scene, and a musical Diehard battery at song camp as teacher and coach here in the West. A top notch bassist and professional recording engineer for more than 30 years, he has worked with hundreds of artists at his studios in New York City and Woodstock, including engineering and playing on the legendary Fast Folk Musical Magazine recordings. He’ll be everywhere at song camp—tap Mark for bass lessons, combo performance help, chart writing, and Mac Garageband 101. He’s also the camp Guitar Doctor… we think he has a blue Gui-Tardis.


Janet Croteau
Description pending


Laura Benson and Dave Pascoe from Late For The TrainLate For The Train
David Pascoe and Laura Benson are founding members of Late for the Train. These songwriters and multi-instrumentalists straddle the line between folk trio and string band with instrumental versatility, rich vocals and subtle harmonies. Their music ranges from joyful fiddle tunes and bluegrass riffs to melancholic folk songs, true to the tradition of narrative songwriting and storytelling.

During their tours in California, Oregon, New Mexico and Colorado, Late for the Train has played at notable venues and festivals such as Telluride’s historic Sheridan Opera House, the Music on the Mothership Festival in Taos, Cervantes’ Other Side in Denver and Soho Music Club in Santa Barbara.


Linda Patterson
has been an artist all her life, working in many different media, including canvas, concrete design and sculpture. She paints in watercolors, oils, pastels and acrylics. Her Saturday afternoon class includes painting demonstrations and a variety of techniques in water media, inspired by our lovely oceanside location. She is here for you, with personal guidance to nurture your creativity, while encouraging you to listen to your own artistic voice. In addition to her visual art, she’s attended song camp regularly for several camps, and writes lyrics and spoken word, as does her husband Virgil. Words and paint—it’s all art!

Linda has a BA in Fine Art from the University of Wisconsin, an MS in Education from Cal State and an MFA in Fine Art from SFSU.